Money quotes about Web 2.0

Excerpts from Computerweekly.com

Wake up to the dawn of Web 2.0

“The cost of collaboration in an open market used to be more expensive than the cost of doing the business process internally. The web has dropped the cost of collaboration so much that people can come together at low-cost,” says (Don) Tapscott.

Alan Lafley, Proctor & Gamble chief executive officer, said, “Someone outside your organisation today knows how to answer your specific question, solve your specific problem or take advantage of your current opportunity better than you do. You need to find them and find a way to work collaboratively and productively with them.”

Web 2.0 will mean consumers are able to draw on a vast array of information, pulling on blogs, wikis, and seeking real-time buying advice from online friends, allowing them to make more informed buying decisions. This means they will no longer rely on the limited expertise of [company] staff, says Gartner.

Forrester Research predicts that Web 2.0 will become core to business systems within 18 months.

Using Windows Live Writer

Testing this for the first time. Seems to be enough good comments on other blogs (GigaOm, TechCrunch among others) to give it a try.

Seed and Weed

I just watched Michael Arrington’s interview video with a bunch of Web 2.0 CEO’s. Very thought provoking, in bits and pieces… One quote that really struck me was from Jotspot CEO, Joe Kraus. He was talking about the future of publishing and publishers. His view is that the publisher’s role will be to "seed and weed". In other words, put initial ideas out there and see what happens to grow, while keeping an eye on things and making sure too many weeds (trolls, spam, etc.) don’t choke out the growth of the good content.

I wonder how this metaphor could be carried over to marketing.

The big concern of traditional organizations is loosing control of the message. Therefore most traditional marketing is about driving traffic back to the controlled content source, the corporate web site.

Viral marketing, the apparent preferred approach of Web 2.0 generation organizations, on the other hand is primarily concerned with the spread of "the word", by mouth, by net, whatever. The main concern seems to be maximizing the spread, regardless of how true to the originally intended message.

Maybe "Seed & Weed" is the common ground between these two approaches. This would foster spreading the word while maintaining intended focus, if not control. Not quite sure what this would look like, just an idea…